Things To Do In Falmouth

As promised, after my last post, this post is dedicated to how we spent our time whilst in the lovely seaside town of Falmouth, Cornwall.

Pendennis Castle: We spent our first full day exploring this English Heritage Sight. Set atop a hill, overlooking the Cornish Coast and estuary, Pendennis Castle boasts incredible views. But with the Castle dating back to the 1500’s, built for Henry VIII, the historic castle has far more to offer than just scenic views. Wander the grounds of the castle and you’ll come across archifacts and buildings from World War I, the premises are impeccably maintained, leaving the imagination to explore days past.

St Mawes: Take a short ferry journey (20 minutes) from Falmouth docks across the estuary to St Mawes and you’ll find yourself lost in the quaint beauty of the sweet town. Away from the busyness of Falmouth, St Mawes takes pride in its slightly more peaceful atmosphere, yet far from deserted surroundings. We ate lunch in a restaurant called ‘The View’ where we enjoyed midday sandwiches and cake with views of the estuary. There are plenty of places to eat out in St. Mawes depending on your budget and preferences. We spent time wandering the streets and admiring the thatched roof houses and pastel coloured cottages sat along the coastal road, before heading the the beach for a relax in the mid-afternoon sun and a swim. You can buy the ferry tickets from Falmouth docks, a return ticket will typically cost you about £10pp however we struck gold and got ours for half price. You can get any (as far as I’m aware) ferry back from St Mawes – just check when the last boat is so you’re not stranded!

St Mawes Castle: If you choose to spend a day visiting St Mawes, why not make a trip to the local castle? With limited time I’m Falmouth, we never got round to visiting the Castle, however when returning to Falmouth in the future, I’m sure we will.

Gylly Beach: The most popular beach in Falmouth, being Gylly Beach, is a blue flag beach and well worth a visit. We spent a lot of time here, I can assume that it gets very busy during the summer season, however with visiting at the end of September, the masses of people had disappeared. Quite simply, it’s a beautiful beach, and there always seems to be something going on here, so if you love to idle away your afternoon people watching, then you’ll be in your element. If that’s not your thing, then get involved in a club that’s being run, hire a paddle board from WESUP situated on the beach front, or grab a bite or drink to eat from Gylly Beach Café.

Swanpool Beach: Just further down the coast from Gylly Beach, Swanpool Beach is roughly a 10-15 minute walk from Gylly. The walk itself is worth doing, with the coastal path accessing stunning views, it’s great for photographs or just to enjoy to fresh air and scenic path. Do be aware that it’s a prime spot for runners and a narrow path, so be prepared to regularly stop – but just use this as another excuse to take in the scenery! The beach itself is again, beautiful, seemingly more quiet in comparison to Gylly, but far from empty, colourful beach cafés line one side of the beach, before reaching the Beach Café.

National Maritime Museum: Situated on Falmouth Quayside (near Pizza Express, Lemon Twist, Rick Stein’s etc.) the Museum is full of information on local, national and international sea stories. Exhibitions range from Titanic Stories, to local and international objects from the sea. The museum is interactive, so great for kids too, and they often have seasonal exhibitions and attractions going on within the museum. The museum itself is independent and charity run, and the fees for entering go directly into the museum, so by visiting you’re helping to run and keep the museum open!

Gardens/Parks: There are a range of stunning gardens and parks within Falmouth, as well as locally to the area. Each garden has something new to offer, whether it be subtropical, tropical, a secluded beach or local plants and flowers. Some parks /gardens worth considering are: Trebah Garden, Penjerrick Garden and Glendurgan Garden.

Eat out: With so many lovely places to eat out, whether that be to start the day off with breakfast, a midday stop for lunch or dine out for dinner, there are an array of cafes and restaurants to suit all desires, so it’d be a shame not to!

It’s also worth checking out what’s going on specifically during your time away, as Falmouth is often home to seasonal attractions and things to do, such as local festivals.

The beauty of Falmouth is that basically everything is in walking distance, and almost wherever you walk you’re treated to incredible views.

Let me know if there’s anything I’ve missed, or if you’re planning a Cornish holiday anytime soon!

Keep smiling,

Beth xx

Leave a Reply